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Sunday Reading Group - 8 September

Bloomsbury at Home

What kind of places did different Bloombury Group members call home? What did ‘home’ mean and how did their ambitions for a new way of living influence that? How did they live? What did everyday domestic life look like? Join us for our October Reading Group, where we peer through the keyholes of various Bloomsbury Group homes – from the Stephens’ family home at Hyde Park Gate, to the London homes dotted around Bloomsbury squares, and of course their country residences. We will read extracts from the ‘newspapers’ created by both the Stephens children and later the Bell children, that illuminate the child’s experience of a Bloomsbury home, and also watch some short clips of life at Ham Spray House. We will also look at how Woolf presented domestic environments in her novels. There will be a special focus on three homes in particular: Ham Spray (the home of Carrington, Lytton Strachey and Ralph Partridge), Lady Ottoline’s Garsington Manor (‘Britain’s most scandalous wartime retreat’), and of course, Charleston.

Bloomsbury at Home
What kind of places did different Bloombury Group members call home? What did ‘home’ mean and how did their ambitions for a new way of living influence that? How did they live? What did everyday domestic life look like? Join us for our October Reading Group, where we peer through the keyholes of various Bloomsbury Group homes – from the Stephens’ family home at Hyde Park Gate, to the London homes dotted around Bloomsbury squares, and of course their country residences. We will read extracts from the ‘newspapers’ created by both the Stephens children and later the Bell children, that illuminate the child’s experience of a Bloomsbury home, and also watch some short clips of life at Ham Spray House. We will also look at how Woolf presented domestic environments in her novels. There will be a special focus on three homes in particular: Ham Spray (the home of Carrington, Lytton Strachey and Ralph Partridge), Lady Ottoline’s Garsington Manor (‘Britain’s most scandalous wartime retreat’), and of course, Charleston.

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Ticket options

  • Sunday Reading Group Ticket - 8 September £9.50 0 30 max
  • Sunday Reading Group Concession Ticket - 8 September £7.50 For Friends of Charleston, over 65, student, green traveller, job-seeker, disabled 0 30 max
Clear selection Please select the amount of tickets before proceeding

Bloomsbury at Home

What kind of places did different Bloombury Group members call home? What did ‘home’ mean and how did their ambitions for a new way of living influence that? How did they live? What did everyday domestic life look like? Join us for our October Reading Group, where we peer through the keyholes of various Bloomsbury Group homes – from the Stephens’ family home at Hyde Park Gate, to the London homes dotted around Bloomsbury squares, and of course their country residences. We will read extracts from the ‘newspapers’ created by both the Stephens children and later the Bell children, that illuminate the child’s experience of a Bloomsbury home, and also watch some short clips of life at Ham Spray House. We will also look at how Woolf presented domestic environments in her novels. There will be a special focus on three homes in particular: Ham Spray (the home of Carrington, Lytton Strachey and Ralph Partridge), Lady Ottoline’s Garsington Manor (‘Britain’s most scandalous wartime retreat’), and of course, Charleston.

Bloomsbury at Home
What kind of places did different Bloombury Group members call home? What did ‘home’ mean and how did their ambitions for a new way of living influence that? How did they live? What did everyday domestic life look like? Join us for our October Reading Group, where we peer through the keyholes of various Bloomsbury Group homes – from the Stephens’ family home at Hyde Park Gate, to the London homes dotted around Bloomsbury squares, and of course their country residences. We will read extracts from the ‘newspapers’ created by both the Stephens children and later the Bell children, that illuminate the child’s experience of a Bloomsbury home, and also watch some short clips of life at Ham Spray House. We will also look at how Woolf presented domestic environments in her novels. There will be a special focus on three homes in particular: Ham Spray (the home of Carrington, Lytton Strachey and Ralph Partridge), Lady Ottoline’s Garsington Manor (‘Britain’s most scandalous wartime retreat’), and of course, Charleston.